Washed Up!


washed up

Rich Smukler specializes in Landscape and Fine-Art Photography from his studio in South Florida. His works have been featured in numerous museums, galleries and private collections internationally. You can see more of his works at http://www.richsmuklerphoto.com. (Kick back and stay awhile).

ARLES, FRANCE – The Spiritual Home of VAN GOGH


Arles, FranceArles is one of the most popular destinations in Provence, famous for its significant Roman heritage. It is the spiritual home of Van Gogh, and you will see how this artist was so inspired by the beautiful countryside in this region of France.

Most of the roman and medieval monuments are within walking distance in the old town and can be covered easily on foot in a day. 

Rich Smukler currently resides in Boca Raton, Florida. His works have been featured in numerous museums, galleries and private collections internationally. You can see more of his works at http://www.richsmuklerphoto.com. (Kick back and stay awhile)

Musee d’Orsay, Paris


The clock at Musee d"Orsay Musée d’Orsay  is a museum in Paris, France, on the left bank of the Seine. It is housed in the former Gare d’Orsay, a Beaux-Arts railway station built between 1898 and 1900. The museum holds mainly French art dating from 1848 to 1915, including paintings, sculptures, furniture, and photography. It houses the largest collection of impressionist and post-impressionist masterpieces in the world, by painters including Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, Sisley, Gauguin and Van Gogh. To my way of thinking, though certainly discovered by the public, it provides far more breathing room than its better-known counterpart, The Louvre.

This shot was taken from inside the museum. The iconic clock, oft photographed, looks over the Seine. If you allow your eye to follow further, you will eventually reach Montmartre, known for its many artists. 

Rich Smukler currently resides in Boca Raton, Florida. His works have been featured in numerous museums, galleries and private collections internationally. You can see more of his works at http://www.richsmuklerphoto.com. (Kick back and stay awhile)

HOW DO YOU DEFINE A FINE ARTIST?


 

 

Over the years I have gone to hundreds of museums and galleries, studied the works of the masters, read the analyses and opinions of critics, seen and opined on the works of my fellow students and mentors. All the time, I am searching for a thread, a common denominator. What makes a piece of art wonderful, memorable or just plain awful? And within that question, I try to evaluate the body of work of that particular artist and ask whether or not this is the work of a fine artist?

 

 

George DeWolfe, in one of his master classes, fascinated me with his revealing analysis of paintings of the masters, such as Rembrandt, Degas, Cezannes, Pollack and others, as they related to development of the fine black and white photo. He took images of these paintings and reduced them to grayscale to better view the breadth of tonality in each of these pieces of art, even before photography was on the map. This was done to demonstrate some of the amazing qualities of these painters, all painting with color, but somehow fully understanding the quality of composition in its underlying tonality. They knew how to see well. Dewolfe went on to say that,

 

  “The masterful articulation of the grayscale in these paintings is not only the key to good color, but also the essential key to creating presence in the work – the foundational element of a masterpiece.”

 

 

This is as good a place as any to start our thought process.

 

I confess that often I’ll go to a museum and wander through the exhibits and unfortunately, not get it. I mean that I am not moved, wouldn’t want to own it, in fact, I am angry that I am wasting my time! And yet, these exhibitions, installations, or pieces of art are often heralded by the museum, or someone of credibility, as being significant and noteworthy. I shrug my shoulders.

 

What does impress me however, is when an artist has over the years developed a unique and consistent body of work; pieces that would be recognizable as being that artists’ artwork years after being produced, yet, in some way, different from the earlier work. I am sure we are all familiar with some exceedingly successful artists who have a signature style that is forever recognized as being special and unique. Some of these artists, unfortunately, get caught up in their success and are fearful of leaving an established comfort zone. Others display the guts and artistry to move forward with newer and more challenging work. I say SHAME on the former, and HATS OFF to the latter.

 

 

I am willing to allow the definition of a fine artist to remain somewhat undefined for the moment. I am steadfast, however, in my belief that a fine artist will create a unique and recognizable body of work that continues to evolve as the artist explores and builds on the past. We owe a debt of gratitude to those of you that adhere to these convictions. What are your thoughts?

HAPPY SHOOTING!

You can see works of Rich Smukler at www.richsmuklerphoto.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Against the Traffic: The Road From SAN QUIRICO D’ORCIA To PIENZA


Both San Quirico and Pienza are magical, ancient Tuscan towns that merit comment and will be the subject of future articles. Today, however, we will visit the extraordinarily exciting road that connects these two towns and strums the true sounds of Tuscany. For years I have driven the 6.25 miles of this amazing highway and never tire of it.

SP146 / Strada Provinciale di Chianciano ribbons through the Tuscan countryside and is the stuff that Lamborghini and Ferrari must have had in mind. Go as the sun rises or as the sun is stretching its long shadows from the west. Any time of year will reveal the many facets of this magnificent countryside. There is one lane in each direction with multiple winding curves that provide a bonanza of sight lines. At a decent speed the entire ride is about 15 minutes. Downshifting into one of the many hairpins is just plain awesome!

MAJOR RULE: DON’T FORGET YOUR TRIPOD! (Say that at least three times). I know it is a pain schlepping it across the world, but you won’t regret it. Your images will be infinitely better. Also, be prepared for some atmospheric challenges. This part of Tuscany is rural and agricultural. You may  find some dust kicked up from the tractors and such. That can be also be great news for your shots, as the combination of light and dust can produce wonderful results. Be ready to clean your lenses regularly while out in the field. If you are carrying a backup camera body, I suggest you select your two favorite lenses, one for each body, and refrain from removing your lenses from their bodies while the dust is swirling. Or, you can always retreat to the car.

For a little extra delight, as you approach Pienza, look to your left for a sign to Santa Anna Comprena. This back road will take you to the 15th Century Monastery where Director Anthony Minghella shot many scenes from his movie The English Patient starring Juliette Binoche and Ralph Fienes. The setting is both serene and haunting. It has been turned into a B&B and you will be able to shoot inside the church, both memorable and challenging.

Happy Shooting!

You can see more of my images from Tuscany at www.richsmuklerphoto.com

TRAVEL TO SHOOT? THE MEANING OF TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY


Having returned from a photography trip to Kenya and Tanzania, I was brimming over with pride at the many exotic images I captured: Kilimanjaro, the Maasai tribesmen, the Serengeti and all that Africa has to offer. I was living my dream. That’s when a cold towel slapped me across my face! At our monthly photo-group meeting I was itchy to show some of this new work. Meanwhile, one of our members was displaying some truly great images that he had just taken in his backyard! An interesting point-counterpoint crossed my mind.

What is the concept of TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY all about? Travel for me isn’t as much fun as it used to be. I’ve shot world-wide and have seen many of the wonders the world provides. Air travel has presented new challenges. My old bones aren’t what they used to be. Yet, there is still a rush that I get when plying my craft in new and unique locations. I see things with a fresher eye. My hometown is Boca Raton, Florida, replete with many exotic sights. However, I wouldn’t consider shooting in my hometown as TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY. Ironically, someone who has traveled from Africa to Florida to shoot probably WOULD. So, if it isn’t the travel that lures me, and if locations can be treated as fungible widgets, then perhaps it is something else? Perhaps it is the mindset or dedication to the craft when you are on a new location (wherever that might be)? Perhaps it is being totally focused and immersed in all things photographic when you are situated in a location that is conducive to your full attention?

Some years ago I was part of a workshop sponsored by TPW (Toscana Photographic Workshop) and led by Arno Minkkinen. Arno is the consummate instructor. He tirelessly challenges his students to be as creative and innovative as possible. One of his exercises, which caught my imagination, was a road trip that we took to Lake Bosena, situated in the Lazio region and close to the boundaries with Umbria and Tuscany. There were only about eight of us and we decided to take three cars. And though we had an end destination in mind, it was decided by Arno to stop every fifteen minutes and shoot for about ten minutes per location. We stopped once on the side of a barren field, a commercial site and a location in some hillside area. None of these locations would have typically caught my eye or called out to me to stop and shoot. Yet, the images gathered by our group from these locations were exceptionally interesting and memorable. Lesson learned: Perhaps the setting isn’t as important as the photographer and his will to see well.                                  

Another unintentioned lesson was learned in Arno’s class. One member of our group was a young woman who was seriously injured and permanently confined to a wheel chair. Only through her sister’s love, was she able to travel thousands of miles from the United States in order to fulfill her dream of shooting in Tuscany. An amazing feat! She shared her portfolio early in the workshop with the rest of us. The main body of her work was comprised of a series of images taken from her basement apartment. Being wheel-chair bound as she was, she had a single view from a window which looked out and up on a street in New York City. The view was limited, yet her pictures were fascinating and multidimensional. She also had invited people to come to her cramped quarters and photographed them against a single wall where she produced a series of intensely moving portraits. The lighting and composition were astounding. I will never forget them or the lesson she brought to us.

I love the whole concept of TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY and am proud of many of the images captured over the years. Yet, I have grown to believe that it is the mindset that comes with travel that is most important. I ring this thought up each time I dust off my camera for another shoot.

Happy Shooting!

You can see more of my images on my website at www.richsmuklerphoto.com.

I HATE MY CANON D5 MARK II CAMERA!!!


NOT REALLY! I’ve been a satisfied Canon user for years pre-dating digital: from the AE-1 35mm SLR Film Camera, 20D, EOS T2i, 40D and now the D5 Mark II. I have to say that I am thrilled with the D5 and am amazed at its power and versatility.

I know that some of us out there are Nikon enthusiasts and others are Canon. It just so-happened that when I was converting to digital some years ago, most of my instructors were into Canon. I started down that path and saw no reason to change, especially due to the lens interchangeability feature.

Some months ago I was shooting out in Santa Monica, California. Typically, I carry the camera with the strap around my neck (either over one shoulder with my camera to the side, or with the camera hanging in front of me). I am recovering from recent neck surgery and after several hours the weight of the camera begins to take its toll. I sought advice from a friendly neighborhood camera shop.

They came up with a two-part solution. The first was a Tamrac Neoprene Shock Absorber Strap. It a tough stretchy neoprene rubber strap that holds most digital SLRs and absorbs the weight of the camera for hours, or so they claim. It acts like a bungee cord and really does the job. The second solution was a carry bag which is big enough to hold the camera and can be worn with a built-in belt around your waist or a built-in strap that you can carry over your shoulder. I purchased a second Tamrac strap to replace the strap that came with the case. I find that the camera, when in the case, isn’t nearly as accessible for quick shooting in comparison to the camera being around the shoulder.I chose a Canon carry case. It has a front-ended pouch which can hold a couple batteries and memory cards. There is another interior compartment for whatever else you miight choose. I know that there are several brands of these cases and recommend you select the best for your particular needs.

This system works for me and I hope it is of some value to you as well. By the way, I own no stock or have any financial interest whatsoever in any of these products.

Happy Shooting!

You can see more of my images at my website at www.richsmuklerphoto.com.